Ancient Egyptian Reproductions

Welcome to Wonderful Things Art, established in 2020 to share high-quality digital reproductions of Ancient Egyptian artwork based on real Egyptian sites and museum collections.

My reproductions are created digitally using only the original source material to ensure they are as authentic as possible. I do extensive research into the background of the piece’s history before I start, deciphering the symbolism behind the artwork and, where possible, translating the hieroglyphs.

 

I like to select artwork that isn’t as well known as the great treasures often replicated when telling Egypt’s story, bringing my archaeological perspective to every piece.

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The Goddess Hathor and Seti I

Tomb of Seti I, Valley of the Kings

Reproduction of a 19th Dynasty bas-relief from the tomb of Seti I, showing Hathor welcoming the dead pharaoh.

This beautiful relief was part of the decoration of the tomb well-preserved tomb of King Seti I (KV17) in the Valley of the Kings. It depicts the Pharoah, Seti, walking towards the still figure of the goddess Hathor, who played an important role in welcoming the dead to the underworld and accompanying them into the afterlife.

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The Feast of Nebamun

Tomb-Chapel of Nebamun, Theban Necropolis

Reproduction of a feasting scene from the 18th Dynasty tomb chapel of Nebamun in Thebes.

The plastered walls of the scribe's tomb were richly and skilfully decorated with lively fresco paintings, depicting idealised views of Nebamun’s life and activities. An entire wall shows a banquet in his honour. Naked serving-girls and servants wait on his friends, colleagues and relatives, who are entertained by musicians and dancers.

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The Goddess Nephthys and the Four Sons of Horus

Coffin of Nespawershefyt, Fitzwilliam Museum

Reproduction of a scene from the Book of the Dead, taken from a 21st Dynasty coffin.

The scene features the goddess Nephthys, flanked by the four Sons of Horus; Hapi, Imseti, Duamutef and Qebehsenuef.

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Nebamun Hunting in the Marshes in the Afterlife

Tomb-Chapel of Nebamun, Theban Necropolis

Reproduction of a tomb painting from the 18th Dynasty tomb chapel of Nebamun.

 

Nebamun is shown hunting birds in a small boat with his wife Hatshepsut and their young daughter, in the marshes of the Nile. The hieroglyphic caption says Nebamun is "taking enjoyment (and) seeing good things".

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The Goddesses Isis and Nephthys Praising Osiris 

The Papyrus of Ani, British Museum

Reproduction of a vignette from a 19th Dynasty copy of the Book of the Dead.

The motif symbolises rebirth and the sunrise and shows the sun disc of the god Ra raised into the sky by an ankh-sign (signifying life) and a djed-pillar (signifying stability and the god Osiris). It is being adored by the sister goddesses Isis and Nephthys, and baboons.

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The Sky Goddess Nut and the Earth God Geb at the Creation of the World

Papyrus of Nespakashuty, Louvre Museum

Reproduction of a scene from a 21st Dynasty mythological papyrus.

 

The vignette illustrates the story of the separation of the sky (Nut) and earth (Geb) and the creation of the world. The solar boat, with its rudder, sails across the space between the two deities.

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The Winged Goddess Isis from Tutankhamun's Sarcophagus Shrine

Tomb of Tutankhamun, Valley of the Kings

Reproduction of the ancient Egyptian goddess Isis, with protective wings outstretched, taken from the golden shrine of Tutankhamun dating to 1324 BC.

The hieroglyphics surrounding the goddess are spells from the Book of the Dead and Tutankhamun’s various names and titles are given in cartouches. 

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The Weighing of the Heart in the Presence of the Gods in the Underworld

Papyrus of Ani, British Museum

Reproduction of a scene from the Book of the Dead, taken from the Papyrus of Ani dating from c. 1250 BC.

 

It depicts Ani during the Weighing of the Heart before the gods in the underworld and contains the spells he’d need to safely pass this judgement.

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The Judgement of the Dead by Osiris

Papyrus of Hunefer, British Museum

Reproduction of a vignette from the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, taken from the Papyrus of Hunefer from c. 1450 BC.

It shows the god of the underworld Osiris, flanked by his sisters Isis and Nephthys, listening to the evidence from Hunefer’s judgement and granting him admittance in the afterlife.

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Paris Louvre Antiquities Egypt 1290-1224

Ramesses II as a Child

Bas-relief, Louvre Museum

Reproduction of a bas-relief depicting the Ramesses II in the pose of a child from the New Kingdom.

 Ramesses is depicted in the traditional pose of a child, seated on a soft cushion, his finger to his lips, and his head bare except for a braid of hair falling to one side. The cushion reproduces the hieroglyphic sign of the akhet, or horizon.

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Anubis Overseeing The Opening of the Mouth Ceremony

Papyrus of Hunefer, British Museum

Reproduction of a vignette from the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, taken from the Papyrus of Hunefer from c. 1450 BC.

 

The mummy of Hunefer is supported by the god Anubis (or a priest wearing a jackal mask) whilst Hunefer's wife and daughter mourn, and three priests perform rituals. The two priests with white sashes are carrying out the Opening of the Mouth ritual (Spell 22).

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The Creation God Atum Repels the Snake God of Chaos Apep

Tomb of Ramesses I, Valley of the Kings

 Reproduction of a scene from the ancient Egyptian Book of Gates showing the creation god Atum repelling the serpent of chaos, Apep (Apophis).

The Book of Gates is a funerary text that narrates the passage of a newly deceased soul into the next world, corresponding to the journey of the sun through the underworld during the hours of the night.

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Thoth in Baboon Form, Holding the Eye Of Horus

Great Harris Papyrus, British Museum

Reproduction of a detail from a 20th Dynasty hieratic papyrus found in a tomb near Medinet Habu.

 

Thoth, the god of wisdom and writing, is shown in his baboon form holding an Eye of Horus symbol. This refers to an ancient myth describing a battle between Horus and Set in which Horus´ right eye was torn out. Thoth magically restored Horus' eye, at which point it was given the name “Wadjet” meaning “whole”.

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Dancing Girl

Ostracon fragment

Reproduction of a dancing girl, taken from an ostracon fragment dating to c. 1200 BC, now in Museo Egizio in Turin.

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Eye of Ra with Ibis Representing Scribe God Thoth

Papyrus

 Reproduction of an Eye of Ra symbol with scribe deity Thoth's emblem, the Ibis bird.

 

This is taken from a copy of the Ancient Egyptian 'Book of Coming Forth out of Darkness into Light' (Book of the Dead) papyrus from Thebes, dating to around 1070 BC.

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Predynastic River Festival

Pottery jar, The Metropolitan Museum

 Reproduction of a Naqada II period pottery jar showing a river festival and the fauna of Egypt.

 

This is taken from a unprovenanced jar in the Metropolitan Museum collection dating to around c. 3450 to 3330 BC.

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Tree of Life

Tomb of Khnumhotep II, Beni Hassan

 Reproduction of a tomb painting showing the Tree of Life, a potent symbol and icon in Egyptian mythology. The fruit of the tree was thought to provide eternal life and knowledge of the cycles of time.

This painting can be found in the tomb of provincial governor Khnumhotep II in at Beni Hasan and dates to 1900 BC. It is part of a much larger scene depicting Khnumhotep hunting in the marshes and netting birds.

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The Winged Goddess Isis from Tutankhamun's Outer Sarcophagus

Tomb of Tutankhamun, Valley of the Kings

Reproduction of the ancient Egyptian goddess Isis, with protective wings outstretched, taken from the golden shrine of Tutankhamun dating to 1324 BC.

The hieroglyphics surrounding the goddess are spells from the Book of the Dead and Tutankhamun’s various names and titles are given in cartouches. 

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DP20B - Winged Isis Mockup 3.jpg
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The Weighing of the Heart and Judgement by Osiris

Papyrus of Hunefer, British Museum

Reproduction of a vignette from the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, taken from the Papyrus of Hunefer from c. 1450 BC.

 

It depicts Hunefer during the Weighing of the Heart before the gods in the underworld and contains the spells he’d need to safely pass judgement by Osiris and the gods of the Ennead.

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Thoth, Atum and Seshat Celebrating Rameses Under The Persea Tree 

Ramesseum, Theban Necropolis

Reconstruction of a partially destroyed wall relief from the Ramesseum, the mortuary temple dedicated to Ramesses II in Thebes dating from the 19th Dynasty.

 

The scene depicts the deities Atum, Seshat and Thoth inscribing the name of Rameses into the fruit of the persea, the sacred tree of Heliopolis. By doing this the gods are guaranteeing Rameses an everlasting reign and innumerable jubilees. 

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The Offering Table of Watetkhethor

Mastaba of Mereruka, Saqqara Necropolis

Reproduction of a wall painting in the tomb of Watetkhethor, daughter of king Teti, dating to Dynasty 6 (around 2290 BC).

It shows Watetkhethor seated in front of a table of offerings, whilst servants bring her legs of meat and birds to add to her piles of bread and gifts of flowers. The offering scene was the most important piece of art in an Ancient Egyptian tomb, as it provided the spells necessary for the deceased to continue eating and drinking in the afterlife.

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The Pharaoh Seti with Horus, Thoth and the Two Ladies

Temple of Seti I, Abydos

Reproduction of a relief from a chapel in the Temple of Seti I, dating to Dynasty 19 (around 1290–1279 BC).

The king sits between the Two Ladies, the vulture goddess Nekhbet of Upper Egypt, and the cobra goddess Wadjet, her counterpart in Lower Egypt, surrounded by symbols relating to the concept of unity. The ritual unification of the Two Lands is also symbolised by the sema-tawi symbol, combining a knotted papyrus plant representing Upper Egypt and a reed plant representing lower Egypt.

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The Heb-Sed Festival of King Den

Tomb of Den, Uum el-Qaab (Abydos)

Reproduction of a label depicting one of the earliest known pharaohs, the Dynasty 1 king Den, as well as some of the earliest hieroglyphs.

 

It was found in his tomb in Abydos and dates to around 3000 BC. The top register depicts the king running in his Heb Sed festival as well as seated on a throne, whereas the lower register depicts the destruction of enemy strongholds and the taking of captives.

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The Scribe Nebqed with Offerings

Papyrus of Nebqed, Musée du Louvre

Reproduction of a vignette from the Book of the Dead created for the royal scribe Nebqed, scribe of Ma'at in the house of Ma'at during the reign of king Amenhotep III around 1400 BC.

Nebqed can be seen wearing standing before a pile of funerary offerings, including bundles of lotus flowers, baskets of fruits and grain, bread, fowl and cuts of meat. He wears a wig with triangular stepped sides, a white linen robe, and a scribal palette is tucked into his belt.

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Queen Nefertari and Isis

Tomb of Nefertari QV66, Valley of the Queens

Reproduction of a painting from the tomb of Queen Nefertari in the Valley of the Queens dating to Dynasty 19. The Great Wife of Ramesses II is being led by the hand of the goddess Isis into the afterlife.

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The Boy-King Tutankhamun and His Young Wife Ankhesenamun

Tomb of Tutankhamun KV62, Valley of the Kings

Reproduction based on a small panel found on a golden statue shrine known as a Noas found in the treasury room of Tutankhamun’s tomb. It depicts Princess Ankhesenamun sitting with her husband the boy king Tutankhamun, who is pouring fragrant perfume into her hands.

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Queen Nefertari, Goddess Isis and Beetle-Headed Sun God Khepri

Tomb of Nefertari QV66, Valley of the Queens

Reproduction of a painting from the tomb of Queen Nefertari in the Valley of the Queens dating to Dynasty 19. The Great Wife of Ramesses II is being led by the hand of the goddess Isis towards Khepri, the beetle-headed sun god.

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Musicians at the Feast of Nebamun

Tomb-Chapel of Nebamun, Theban Necropolis

Reproduction of a feasting scene from the tomb chapel of Nebamun in Thebes, Egypt, now on display in the British Museum.

 

It shows a group of female musicians playing instruments, singing and clapping as they perform a song for the feast-goers. The words of the song dedicated to the gods Ptah and Geb are written above their heads.

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Baboons Praising the Morning Sun

Unknown findspot, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Reproduction of a relief panel dating to 400–200 BC.
It depicts two baboons offering wedjat eyes to the god Khepri, the newborn sun represented by a beetle. In his front legs, Khepri holds a disk with a star, which is the sign for the Duat or Underworld, and beneath him, there is a sun with rays. The baboons are similar to the baboons often shown heralding the sunrise by dancing and screeching, but here they are associated with the god Thoth by the wedjat (eye) signs they hold.

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Singers at the Feast of Nebamun

Tomb-Chapel of Nebamun, Theban Necropolis

Reproduction of a feasting scene from the tomb chapel of Nebamun in Thebes, Egypt, now on display in the British Museum.

 

It shows a group of female musicians playing instruments, singing and clapping as they perform a song for the feast-goers.

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Scribe Neqbed Praising Osiris and Nekhbet in the Afterlife

Papyrus of Nebqed, Musée du Louvre

Reproduction of a vignette from the Book of the Dead created for the royal scribe Nebqed, scribe of Ma'at in the house of Ma'at during the reign of king Amenhotep III around 1400 BC.

 

Nebqed can be seen wearing standing before a pile of funerary offerings, including bundles of lotus flowers, baskets of fruits and grain, bread, fowl and cuts of meat. He wears a wig with triangular stepped sides, a white linen robe, and a scribal palette is tucked into his belt.

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A Prehistoric Hippo Hunt

Unknown findspot, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Reproduction of a prehistoric white cross-lined ware bowl from the Naqada period (c. 3700-3450 BC).

 

A man wearing a penis-sheath and an animal’s tail can be seen holding two cords attached to harpoons now embedded in the face of the large hippo that faces him. A second smaller hippo, behind the first, shares the same fate. The zig zag patterns represent the landscape the hunt is taking place within.

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The Goddess Nekhbet in Vulture Form

Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, Deir el-Bahri

Reproduction of the Goddess Nekhbet in vulture form taken from the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el-Bahri.

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Musicians at the Feast of Nebamun

Tomb-Chapel of Nebamun, Theban Necropolis

Reproduction of a feasting scene from the tomb chapel of Nebamun in Thebes, Egypt, now on display in the British Museum.

 

It shows a group of female musicians playing instruments, singing and clapping as they perform a song for the feast-goers.

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Kay, Head of the Desert Hunters

Possibly Qamula, Thebes North

Reproduction of the Stela of Kay dated to early Dynasty 12 (c. 1976-1912 BC), now in the Neues Museum, Berlin.

 

Picked out in raised relief is Kay, accompanied by an unnamed woman assumed to be his wife or mother Beshet, and five hunting dogs. The inscription is designed to give offerings to Kay for his afterlife and recounts his service to the king by patrolling the western oases and tracking down fugitives.

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Brothers or Lovers? Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep

Mastaba of Khnumhotep and Niankhkhnum, Saqqara Necropolis

Reproduction of ta tomb painting from the Dynasty 5 Mastaba of Khnumhotep and Niankhkhnum.

 

On the western wall of the outer hall of their tomb is a striking portrayal of the two men in close embrace, their noses touching in a pose that is the most intimate allowed in Egyptian art. This has led many to speculate on the relationship of the two men; were they brothers? Twins? Lovers? If the latter was true, they would be the first same-sex couple recorded in history.

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Tutankhamun and Ankhesenamun in a Floral Pavillion

Tomb of Tutankhamun (KV62), Valley of the Kings

Reproduction of the backrest of the golden throne of Tutankhamun dated to Dynasty 18 (c. 1336-1327 BC), now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

 

One of the masterpieces of Egyptian art and workmanship, the throne features an evocative image of the young king with his wife, Ankhesenamun, in a floral pavilion. Picked out in a variety of precious metals and gemstones is Tutankhamun, reclining on a throne as Ankhesenamun rubs perfume into his shoulders from the bowl she is carrying.

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"A Walk in The Garden"

Neues Museum, Berlin

Reproduction of a relief usually referred to as a “walk in the garden” dating to Dynasty 18 showing an unknown pharaoh and queen now in the Neues Museum in Berlin.

The pharaoh wears a blue curly wig and a white linen kilt tied with red sashes and is leaning on a walking stick. His queen is wearing a flowing white linen robe tied with red sashes and is presenting the king with flowers from the garden.

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