Ancient Egyptian Reproductions

Welcome to Wonderful Things Art, sharing high-quality reproductions of masterpieces of Ancient Egyptian art.

 

My prints are all based on real sites and items in museum collections around the world. I use academic papers and reference texts to ensure every detail is accurate.

Browse my full collection below and find out more about the history and symbolism contained in each piece.

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The Goddess Hathor and Seti I

Tomb of Seti I, Valley of the Kings

Reproduction of a 19th Dynasty bas-relief from the tomb of Seti I, showing Hathor welcoming the dead pharaoh.

This beautiful relief was part of the decoration of the tomb well-preserved tomb of King Seti I (KV17) in the Valley of the Kings. It depicts the Pharoah, Seti, walking towards the still figure of the goddess Hathor, who played an important role in welcoming the dead to the underworld and accompanying them into the afterlife.

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The Feast of Nebamun

Tomb-Chapel of Nebamun, Theban Necropolis

Reproduction of a feasting scene from the 18th Dynasty tomb chapel of Nebamun in Thebes.

The plastered walls of the scribe's tomb were richly and skilfully decorated with lively fresco paintings, depicting idealised views of Nebamun’s life and activities. An entire wall shows a banquet in his honour. Naked serving-girls and servants wait on his friends, colleagues and relatives, who are entertained by musicians and dancers.

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The Goddess Nephthys and the Four Sons of Horus

Coffin of Nespawershefyt, Fitzwilliam Museum

Reproduction of a scene from the Book of the Dead, taken from a 21st Dynasty coffin.

The scene features the goddess Nephthys, flanked by the four Sons of Horus; Hapi, Imseti, Duamutef and Qebehsenuef.

DP03.02 - Nephthys and the Sons of Horus

Nebamun Hunting in the Marshes in the Afterlife

Tomb-Chapel of Nebamun, Theban Necropolis

Reproduction of a tomb painting from the 18th Dynasty tomb chapel of Nebamun.

 

Nebamun is shown hunting birds in a small boat with his wife Hatshepsut and their young daughter, in the marshes of the Nile. The hieroglyphic caption says Nebamun is "taking enjoyment (and) seeing good things".

DP05.02 - Hunting in the Marshes Detail
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The Goddesses Isis and Nephthys Praising Osiris 

The Papyrus of Ani, British Museum

Reproduction of a vignette from a 19th Dynasty copy of the Book of the Dead.

The motif symbolises rebirth and the sunrise and shows the sun disc of the god Ra raised into the sky by an ankh-sign (signifying life) and a djed-pillar (signifying stability and the god Osiris). It is being adored by the sister goddesses Isis and Nephthys, and baboons.

DP06.02 - The Goddesses Isis and Nephthy
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The Sky Goddess Nut and the Earth God Geb at the Creation of the World

Papyrus of Nespakashuty, Louvre Museum

Reproduction of a scene from a 21st Dynasty mythological papyrus.

 

The vignette illustrates the story of the separation of the sky (Nut) and earth (Geb) and the creation of the world. The solar boat, with its rudder, sails across the space between the two deities.

DP07.02 - Nut and God Geb at the Creatio

The Winged Goddess Isis from Tutankhamun's Sarcophagus Shrine

Tomb of Tutankhamun, Valley of the Kings

Reproduction of the ancient Egyptian goddess Isis, with protective wings outstretched, taken from the golden shrine of Tutankhamun dating to 1324 BC.

The hieroglyphics surrounding the goddess are spells from the Book of the Dead and Tutankhamun’s various names and titles are given in cartouches. 

DP08.02 - Isis Shrine from Tutankhamun's
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The Weighing of the Heart in the Presence of the Gods in the Underworld

Papyrus of Ani, British Museum

Reproduction of a scene from the Book of the Dead, taken from the Papyrus of Ani dating from c. 1250 BC.

 

It depicts Ani during the Weighing of the Heart before the gods in the underworld and contains the spells he’d need to safely pass this judgement.

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The Judgement of the Dead by Osiris

Papyrus of Hunefer, British Museum

Reproduction of a vignette from the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, taken from the Papyrus of Hunefer from c. 1450 BC.

It shows the god of the underworld Osiris, flanked by his sisters Isis and Nephthys, listening to the evidence from Hunefer’s judgement and granting him admittance in the afterlife.

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Paris Louvre Antiquities Egypt 1290-1224

Ramesses II as a Child

Bas-relief, Louvre Museum

Reproduction of a bas-relief depicting the Ramesses II in the pose of a child from the New Kingdom.

 Ramesses is depicted in the traditional pose of a child, seated on a soft cushion, his finger to his lips, and his head bare except for a braid of hair falling to one side. The cushion reproduces the hieroglyphic sign of the akhet, or horizon.

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Anubis Overseeing The Opening of the Mouth Ceremony

Papyrus of Hunefer, British Museum

Reproduction of a vignette from the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, taken from the Papyrus of Hunefer from c. 1450 BC.

 

The mummy of Hunefer is supported by the god Anubis (or a priest wearing a jackal mask) whilst Hunefer's wife and daughter mourn, and three priests perform rituals. The two priests with white sashes are carrying out the Opening of the Mouth ritual (Spell 22).

DP16.02 - Opening of the Mouth Ceremony.
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The Creation God Atum Repels the Snake God of Chaos Apep

Tomb of Ramesses I, Valley of the Kings

 Reproduction of a scene from the ancient Egyptian Book of Gates showing the creation god Atum repelling the serpent of chaos, Apep (Apophis).

The Book of Gates is a funerary text that narrates the passage of a newly deceased soul into the next world, corresponding to the journey of the sun through the underworld during the hours of the night.

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Thoth in Baboon Form, Holding the Eye Of Horus

Great Harris Papyrus, British Museum

Reproduction of a detail from a 20th Dynasty hieratic papyrus found in a tomb near Medinet Habu.

 

Thoth, the god of wisdom and writing, is shown in his baboon form holding an Eye of Horus symbol. This refers to an ancient myth describing a battle between Horus and Set in which Horus´ right eye was torn out. Thoth magically restored Horus' eye, at which point it was given the name “Wadjet” meaning “whole”.

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Dancing Girl

Ostracon fragment

Reproduction of a dancing girl, taken from an ostracon fragment dating to c. 1200 BC, now in Museo Egizio in Turin.

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Eye of Ra with Ibis Representing Scribe God Thoth

Papyrus

 Reproduction of an Eye of Ra symbol with scribe deity Thoth's emblem, the Ibis bird.

 

This is taken from a copy of the Ancient Egyptian 'Book of Coming Forth out of Darkness into Light' (Book of the Dead) papyrus from Thebes, dating to around 1070 BC.

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Predynastic River Festival

Pottery jar, The Metropolitan Museum

 Reproduction of a Naqada II period pottery jar showing a river festival and the fauna of Egypt.

 

This is taken from a unprovenanced jar in the Metropolitan Museum collection dating to around c. 3450 to 3330 BC.

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Tree of Life

Tomb of Khnumhotep II, Beni Hassan

 Reproduction of a tomb painting showing the Tree of Life, a potent symbol and icon in Egyptian mythology. The fruit of the tree was thought to provide eternal life and knowledge of the cycles of time.

This painting can be found in the tomb of provincial governor Khnumhotep II in at Beni Hasan and dates to 1900 BC. It is part of a much larger scene depicting Khnumhotep hunting in the marshes and netting birds.

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The Winged Goddess Isis from Tutankhamun's Outer Sarcophagus

Tomb of Tutankhamun, Valley of the Kings

Reproduction of the ancient Egyptian goddess Isis, with protective wings outstretched, taken from the golden shrine of Tutankhamun dating to 1324 BC.

The hieroglyphics surrounding the goddess are spells from the Book of the Dead and Tutankhamun’s various names and titles are given in cartouches. 

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The Weighing of the Heart and Judgement by Osiris

Papyrus of Hunefer, British Museum

Reproduction of a vignette from the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, taken from the Papyrus of Hunefer from c. 1450 BC.

 

It depicts Hunefer during the Weighing of the Heart before the gods in the underworld and contains the spells he’d need to safely pass judgement by Osiris and the gods of the Ennead.

DP23 - Hunefer Weighing of the Heart.png

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