Item List

A Festival on the River Nile, Naqada Pot

Reproduction of a Naqada II period pottery jar showing a river festival and the fauna of Egypt.
This is taken from a unprovenanced jar in the Metropolitan Museum collection dating to around c. 3450 to 3330 BC.

A Prehistoric Hippo Hunt, Naqada Bowl

Reproduction of a prehistoric white cross-lined ware bowl from the Naqada period (c. 3700-3450 BC).
A man wearing a penis-sheath and an animal’s tail can be seen holding two cords attached to harpoons now embedded in the face of the large hippo that faces him. A second smaller hippo, behind the first, shares the same fate. The zig zag patterns represent the landscape the hunt is taking place within.

A Walk in the Garden

Atum Repelling Apep in the Underworld

Reproduction of a scene from the ancient Egyptian Book of Gates showing the creation god Atum repelling the serpent of chaos, Apep (Apophis).
The Book of Gates is a funerary text that narrates the passage of a newly deceased soul into the next world, corresponding to the journey of the sun through the underworld during the hours of the night.

Brothers or Lovers? Niankhkhnum and Khnumhotep

Dancing Girl

Reproduction of a dancing girl, taken from an ostracon fragment dating to c. 1200 BC.

Deified King Amenhotep I in the Guise of the Mummiform Osiris

Reproduction of the interior of a coffin dating from 400-200 BC showing King Amenhotep I in the guise of Osiris, god of the underworld, The figure is being praised by gods and protected by spells in hieroglyphics.

Isis, from Shrine in Tutankhamun's Tomb

Reproduction of the ancient Egyptian goddess Isis, with protective wings outstretched, taken from the golden shrine of Tutankhamun dating to 1324 BC.
The hieroglyphics surrounding the goddess are spells from the Book of the Dead and Tutankhamun’s various names and titles are given in cartouches.

Khepri and Thoth

Reproduction of a relief panel dating to 400–200 BC. It depicts two baboons offering wedjat eyes to the god Khepri, the newborn sun represented by a beetle. In his front legs, Khepri holds a disk with a star, which is the sign for the Duat or Underworld, and beneath him, there is a sun with rays. The baboons are similar to the baboons often shown heralding the sunrise by dancing and screeching, but here they are associated with the god Thoth by the wedjat (eye) signs they hold.

King Den Running in his Heb-Sed Festival

Reproduction of a label depicting one of the earliest known pharaohs, the Dynasty 1 king Den, as well as some of the earliest hieroglyphs.
It was found in his tomb in Abydos and dates to around 3000 BC. The top register depicts the king running in his Heb Sed festival as well as seated on a throne, whereas the lower register depicts the destruction of enemy strongholds and the taking of captives.

Musicians and Singers at the Feast of Nebamun

Reproduction of a feasting scene from the tomb chapel of Nebamun in Thebes, Egypt, now on display in the British Museum.
It shows a group of female musicians playing instruments, singing and clapping as they perform a song for the feast-goers. The words of the song dedicated to the gods Ptah and Geb are written above their heads.

Musicians at the Feast of Nebamun

Reproduction of a feasting scene from the tomb chapel of Nebamun in Thebes, Egypt, now on display in the British Museum.
It shows a group of female musicians playing instruments, singing and clapping as they perform a song for the feast-goers.